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Medical disclaimer: always check with a physician before consuming wild plants, and make positive identification in the field using a good source such as Medicinal Plants of the Mountain West.  Michael Moore also has a glossary of medical terms in his books, and maps in later editions. ) 

Before getting started, this is what the United Nation’s New World has in store for us War on Health. It is a long video and a Must Watch. What they can’t control is the vitamins, enzymes and minerals found in Natural plants.

#142
Common Name: Russian Olive, Oleaster, Thorny Olive, Silverberry, Autumn Olive
Latin Name: Elaeagnus angustifolia, E. commutata, E. multiflora, E. pungens, E. umbellata
Family: Elaeagnaceae
Range:
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=ELAEA Hawaii, all of North America, except Newfoundland and Labrador. This is the main data for usda.

http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=ELAN All of the lower 48 States except Arkansas and Louisiana to Florida and South Carolina, Indiania, West Virginia and Vermont; In Canada; present from British Columbia to New Brunswick and Nova Scotia.(Elaeagnus angustifolia)
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=ELCO Alaska, Washington, Idaho, Utah, Montana, Wyoming, Utah, Colorado, N. and S. Dakota, Minnesota, Texas, Kentucky and Maryland; In Canada; all except Labdrador, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and New Foundland. (Elaeagnus commutata)
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=ELMU Missouri, Illinois, Kentucky, Ohio, Virginia, Maryland, North Carolina, Alabama, New York, Connecticut, Rhode Island and New Hampshire. (Elaeagnus multiflora)
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=ELPU2 All coastal states from Louisiana to Virginia, plus Tennessee, Kentucky and Massachusetts. (Elaeagnus pungens)
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=ELUM All states east of the Mississippi R. plus Iowa to Louisiana, Nebraska, Kansas, Montana, Washington and Oregon; In Canada; Ontario. (Elaeagnus umbellata)
Photos: (Click on Latin Name after Common Name.)
Warnings: None
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#142(a)
Common Name: Russian Olive, Oleaster, (Elaeagnus angustifolia)

Appearance and Habitat: By streams and along river bans to 3000 meters in Turkey. Europe to W. Asia, extending as far north as latitude 55 in Russia. A deciduous shrub growing to 7 m (23ft) by 7 m (23ft) at a medium rate. It is hardy to zone 2 and is not frost tender. It is in flower in June, and the seeds ripen from Sep to October. It can grow in very alkaline soils and poor soils. This not a native plant in America but was planted by early settlers. It is common enough that some states consider it a noxious tree. I have seen it growing in the Great Basin around farms and the edges of dry lake beds that fill with water during the spring. Elevation – between 3,000 and 4,500 feet.
Edible Uses: Fruit – raw or cooked as a seasoning in soups. Dry, sweet and mealy. The fruit can also be made into jellies or sherbets. The fruit must be fully ripe before it can be enjoyed raw, if even slightly under-ripe it will be quite astringent. The oval fruit is about 10mm long and contains a single large seed. Seed – raw or cooked. It can be eaten with the fruit though the seed case is rather fibrous.
Medicinal Uses :
The oil from the seeds is used with syrup as an electuary in the treatment of catarrh and bronchial affections. The juice of the flowers has been used in the treatment of malignant fevers. The fruit of many members of this genus is a very rich source of vitamins and minerals, especially in vitamins A, C and E, flavanoids and other bio-active compounds. It is also a fairly good source of essential fatty acids, which is fairly unusual for a fruit. It is being investigated as a food that is capable of reducing the incidence of cancer and also as a means of halting or reversing the growth of cancers.
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Elaeagnus+angustifolia
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#142(b)
Common Name: Silver Berry, Wild Olive, Wolf Willow, (Elaeagnus commutata)

Appearance and Habitat: A rounded, twiggy shrub, 1 – 12 feet tall, with narrow, slivery-scurfy leaves on grayish-red branches. Small clusters of inconspicuous, cone-shaped flowers are spicily perfumed with a heavy, sweet scent. The fruit is a dry, mealy, whitish berry. This suckering shrub can form patches several yards in diameter. Fast-growing, long-lived and resistant to disease and insect problems and drought. Transplants well, due to a shallow root system. A very hardy species for cold climates, sometimes used as a windbreak. (The non-native Russian Olive, E. angustifolia, is more extensively used for windbreaks and is becoming invasive.)(1) Dry calcareous slopes in N. America – Quebec to Alaska and south to Utah, S. Dakota and Minnesota. A deciduous shrub growing to 3 m (9ft) by 1.5 m (5ft) at a medium rate. It is hardy to zone 2 and is not frost tender. It is in flower in May, and the seeds ripen from Jul to September.(2)
Edible Uses:Fruit – raw or cooked. Dry and mealy. Good when added to soups they also make an excellent jelly. The fruit must be fully ripe before it can be enjoyed raw, if even slightly under-ripe it will be quite astringent. The fruit contains a single large seed. Seed – raw or cooked. It can be eaten with the fruit though the seed case is rather fibrous.(3)
Medicinal Uses :
A strong decoction of the bark, mixed with oil, has been used as a salve for children with frostbite. A decoction of the roots, combined with sumac roots (Rhus spp.), has been used in the treatment of syphilis. This medicine was considered to be very poisonous and, if you survived it, you were likely to become sterile. The fruit of many members of this genus is a very rich source of vitamins and minerals, especially in vitamins A, C and E, flavanoids and other bio-active compounds. It is also a fairly good source of essential fatty acids, which is fairly unusual for a fruit. It is being investigated as a food that is capable of reducing the incidence of cancer and also as a means of halting or reversing the growth of cancers.(4) 
Foot Notes: (1) http://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=ELCO
Foot Notes: (2, 3, 4) http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Elaeagnus+commutata
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#142(c)
Common Name: Cherry Silverberry (Elaeagnus multiflora)

Appearance and Habitat: A noxious weed grown as ornamental.(1) Thickets and thin woods in hills and on lowlands, at elevations of 600 -1800 meters in E. Asia – China Japan. A deciduous shrub growing to 3 m (9ft) by 2 m (6ft) at a medium rate. It is hardy to zone 6 and is not frost tender. It is in flower from Apr to May, and the seeds ripen in July.(2) When I lived in Chicago, there was one of these trees in a neighbor’s yard. It was filled with fruit every year. Note the ‘noxious weed’.
Edible Uses: Fruit – raw or cooked. Pleasantly acid when ripe, they make a very good dessert fruit though they are usually made into pies, preserves etc. Quite fiddly and difficult to pick without breaking the young shoots. The fruit must be fully ripe before it can be enjoyed raw, if even slightly under-ripe it will be quite astringent. The fruit contains a single large seed. Seed – raw or cooked. It can be eaten with the fruit though the seed case is rather fibrous .(3)
Medicinal Uses :
The fruit of many members of this genus is a very rich source of vitamins and minerals, especially in vitamins A, C and E, flavanoids and other bio-active compounds. It is also a fairly good source of essential fatty acids, which is fairly unusual for a fruit. It is being investigated as a food that is capable of reducing the incidence of cancer and also as a means of halting or reversing the growth of cancers. The leaves are used in the treatment of coughs. The fruit is prescribed in the treatment of watery diarrhoea. The root is astringent, a decoction is used to treat itch and foul sores.(4) 
Foot Notes: (1) http://www.ars-grin.gov/cgi-bin/npgs/html/taxon.pl?14925
Foot Notes: (2, 3, 4) http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Elaeagnus+multiflora
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#142(d)
Common Name: Thorney Olive, Spiny Oleaster, (Elaeagnus pungens)

Appearance and Habitat: A cultivated ornamental.(1) Sunny slopes, road sides and thickets in lowlands, usually below 1000 meters and especially near the sea, in E. Asia-China and Japan. A evergreen shrub growing to 4 m (13ft) by 4 m (13ft) at a medium rate.  It is hardy to zone 7 and is not frost tender. It is in leaf 12-Jan It is in flower from Nov to February, and the seeds ripen from Apr to May.(2)
Edible Uses:Fruit – raw or cooked. About the size of a large blackcurrant, though the seed is also quite large. A nice sub-acid flavour when fully ripe but astringent if eaten before then. Can be made into preserves, drinks etc. The oval fruit is about 15mm long. Seed – raw or cooked. It can be eaten with the fruit though the seed case is rather fibrous. A taste vaguely reminiscent of peanuts. The seed contains 42.2% protein and 23.1% fat on a zero moisture basis.(3)Good composition chart at the website.
Medicinal Uses :
The fruit of many members of this genus is a very rich source of vitamins and minerals, especially in vitamins A, C and E, flavanoids and other bio-active compounds. It is also a fairly good source of essential fatty acids, which is fairly unusual for a fruit. It is being investigated as a food that is capable of reducing the incidence of cancer and also as a means of halting or reversing the growth of cancers. The leaves and the stems are concocted and used in the treatment of asthma, cough, diarrhoea, haemorrhoids etc. The seed is used to treat watery diarrhoea. The root is astringent and is applied to sores, itchy skin etc.(4)
Foot Notes: (1)http://www.ars-grin.gov/cgi-bin/npgs/html/taxon.pl?14928
Foot Notes: (2, 3, 4) http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Elaeagnus+pungens
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#142(e)
Common Name: Autumn Olive, (Elaeagnus umbellata (parvifolia))

Appearance and Habitat: Introduced, an erect, perennial, to 20′ tall shrub; stems twigs have coppery-silver scales. The flower is cream colored, the leaves are oval, 1″-3″ long and the fruit is pink to red. Found on distrubed ground, fields, woods and woodland edges.(1) Shrubberies, 1500 – 3000 meters, found in Afghanistan to S.W. China. Forest openingsat elevations of 1300 to 3000 meters in Nepal. E. Asia – Himalayas. A deciduous shrub growing to 4.5 m (14ft) by 3 m (9ft) at a medium rate. It is hardy to zone 3 and is not frost tender. It is in flower from May to June, and the seeds ripen from Sep to November.(2)
Edible Uses:Fruit – raw, cooked or added to curries. The fruit must be fully ripe before it can be enjoyed raw, if even slightly under-ripe it will be quite astringent – though children seem to love it at the slightly unripe stage. The fruit is about 8mm in diameter and contains a single large seed. Seed – raw or cooked. It can be eaten with the fruit though the seed case is rather fibrous.(3)
Medicinal Uses :
The unripe fruit is astringent and is eaten in the treatment of bloody dysentery. The fruit of many members of this genus is a very rich source of vitamins and minerals, especially in vitamins A, C and E, flavanoids and other bio-active compounds. It is also a fairly good source of essential fatty acids, which is fairly unusual for a fruit. It is being investigated as a food that is capable of reducing the incidence of cancer and also as a means of halting or reversing the growth of cancers.(4)
Foot Notes: (1)  http://wisplants.uwsp.edu/scripts/detail.asp?SpCode=ELAUMB
Foot Notes: (2, 3, 4) http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Elaeagnus+parvifolia
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#143
Common Name: Sheperd’s Purse, Bursa, Bolsa de Pastor
Latin Name: Capsella bursa-pastoris
Family: Brassicaceae
Range:
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=CABU2
All of North America plus Hawaii.
Photos: Here
Warnings: Signs of toxicity are sedation, pupil enlargement and breathing difficulty. Avoid if on treatments for high blood pressure. Aviod with thyriod gland disorders or heart disease. Possible addictive sedative effects with other depressants (Alcohol). Avoid during pregnancy.(1)  Kidney stones may be dislodged and irritate the ureters. Hypertension in the elderly from vasoconstriction in some people. It may stimulate uterine contractions if used during pregnancy.(2)
Appearance and Habitat:
It is an annual from weak tap roots. Stems are simple and branched with short star-shaped hairs. The leaves are mainly basal rosette, lanced shaped and broadest towards the tip, 3 – 6 cm long, stalked, almost entire to pinnately lobed with larger lobe at tip. Stem leaves smaller, alternate, stalkless and clasping. lanced shaped to oblong, mostly shallow, with sharp teeth. The flowers are white with 4 pedals. At first, many flowers in a round cluster, but these are later elongated with fruit. The fruits are pods that are triangular to heart shaped and flattened. Common as a weed in disturbed areas, along roadsides and gardens to up subalpine. It is found throughout N. America.(3) It is a typical member of the mustard family. It is usually a foot tall, but Michael Moore has seen it five foot tall in the Santa Monica Mountains. The plant covers a wide range of growing conditions, in February/March it appears in lower altitudes (San Diego, Tucson, Austin) but by August it will be found at 10,000 feet. Look for it in the spring on baseball diamonds, city parks, unsold sunbelt subdivisions, and later in the spring-early summer it can be found in cattle and horse pastures and in the National Parks.(4)  Arable land, gardens, waste places ect. it is a common weed of cultivated soil. A virtually cosmopolitan plant found in most regions of the world including Britain.(5)
Edible Uses:All parts of shepherd’s purse are edible, but have a biting taste. They can be eaten raw or cooked. The young leaves, used before the plant comes into flower, makes a fine addition to salads, and can be used as a cress and cabbage substitute, however they become peppery with age. The leaves contain about 2.9% protein, 0.2% fat, 3.4% carbohydrate, 1% ash. They are rich in iron, calcium and vitamin C. The young flowering shoots can be eaten, raw or cooked, as well. The seeds, raw or cooked, can be ground into a meal and used in soups, but are difficult to harvest and utilize since they are very small. The seed contains 35% of a fatty oil, which can be extracted and is edible. The seed can be used as a peppery seasoning for soups and stews. The fresh or dried root has been used as a ginger substitute.(6)
Medicinal Uses :
Shepherd’s purse is little used in herbalism, though it is a commonly used domestic remedy, being especially efficacious in the treatment of both internal and external bleeding, diarrhoea etc. A tea made from the whole plant is antiscorbutic, astringent, diuretic, emmenagogue, haemostatic, hypotensive, oxytocic, stimulant, vasoconstrictor, vasodilator and vulnerary. A tea made from the dried herb is considered to be a sovereign remedy against haemorrhages of all kinds – the stomach, the lungs, the uterus and more especially the kidneys. The plant can be used fresh or dried, for drying it is harvested in the summer. The dried herb quickly loses its effectiveness and should not be stored for more than a year. Clinical trials on the effectiveness of this plant as a wound herb have been inconclusive. It appears that either it varies considerably in its effectiveness from batch to batch, or perhaps a white fungus that is often found on the plant contains the medically active properties. The plant has been ranked 7th amongst 250 potential anti-fertility plants in China. It has proven uterine-contracting properties and is traditionally used during childbirth. The plant is a folk remedy for cancer – it contains fumaric acid which has markedly reduced growth and viability of Ehrlich tumour in mice. A homeopathic remedy is made from the fresh plant. It is used in the treatment of nose bleeds and urinary calculus. The German Commission E Monographs, a therapeutic guide to herbal medicine, approve Capsella bursa-pastoris Shepherd’s Purse for nose bleeds, premenstrual syndrome, wounds & burns.(7) When collecting, if it is green and alive, take it all including the roots. It is only good medicine for several months. For tincture, mix 1 part plant with 5 parts 50% alcohol. If you prefer the tea, dry the herb. It has four main uses: 1) to stop bleeding, 2) to relieve inflammation in acute urinary infection, 3) to stimulate kidney excretion of uric acid, and 4) to strengthen and synergize the effects of native oxytocin in homebirths. It contains luteolin 7 rutinoside, quercetin 3 rutinoside, bursinic acid, fumaric acid, tyramine, and choline. It is the rutinoside that strengthens the capillaries and helps stop bleeding. While the bursinic acid acts as a vasoconstrictor. Excess Uric acid crystalizes in mainly toe joints and causes gout, and so it can be very helpful in reducing gout attacks and pseudogout attacks. It helps the kidneys remove nucleoprotein waste products while decreasing blood pressure when they are elevated and helps with the severity of arthritis attacks. It also helps stimulate better phosphate recycling by the kidneys. For bladder infections of garden variety, drink 1/2 teaspoon of the tincture in a cup of warm water every 3 hours, and avoid carbohydrates. The effects of oxytocin on the uterine lining are increased with the herb during child birth. Both midwives and physicians using Shepherd’s Purse before substantial dilation have seen hourglass contractions in the mother’s uterus. Try 1 teaspoon of tincture placed into a cup of warm water and sip it slowly after most of the cervical dilation has occurred. However don’t take it during the pregnancy, only when birthing.( 8 )
Foot Notes: (1, 5, 6, 7)http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Capsella+bursa-pastoris

Foot Notes: (2, 4, 8 ) Medicinal Plants of the Desert and Canyon West by Michael Moore, page 108-109, Publisher: Museum of New Mexico Press, Copyright 1989, ISBN 0-89013-182-1
Foot Notes: ( 3) http://montana.plant-life.org/species/capse_bur.htm

Reproduced, in part, (as well as previous postings under this title) in accordance with Section 107 of title 17 of the Copyright Law of the United States relating to fair-use and is for the purposes of criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research.

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