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Medical disclaimer: always check with a physician before consuming wild plants, and make positive identification in the field using a good source such as Medicinal Plants of the Mountain West.  Michael Moore also has a glossary of medical terms in his books, and maps in later editions. ) 
#140
Common Name: Coffee Berry, Indian Cherry, Pigeon Berry, Buckthorn 
Latin Name:
Rhamnus (Frangula) Californica, Rhamnus (Frangula) carolinianus, Rhamnus purshiana(Frangula purshiana)
Family: Rhamnaceae
Range:
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=FRCAU
California, Nevada, Arizona and New Mexico (Rhamnus (Frangula) Californica)
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=FRCA13 All States south of the Ohio R. and east of the Mississippi R., except W. Virginia, Plus Maryland, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Missouri, Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma and Texas. (Rhamnus (Frangula) Carolinianus)
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=FRPU7 Washington, Oregon, California, Idaho and Montana; In Canada; British Columbia (Rhamnus (Frangula purshiana) cascara)
Photos: (Click on Latin Name after Common Name.)
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#140(a)
Common Name: Coffee Berry, Pigeon Berry, California Buckthorn (Rhamnus californica)

Appearance and Habitat: This is a large shrub growing between 4 and 10 feet tall usually, however the species in Arizona can reach 20 feet tall. Leaves are alternate, have recessed center veins giving them a concave look. The leaves vary along their edges, some are smooth and other serrated. In general the leaves are oblong and up to two and a half inches in length and tend to be yellow on the underside. The leaves can also be hairy or smooth. The flowers are star shaped and yellow-green in color. The berries begin green, then turn red, and finally turn a coffee color. In the coastal ranges of Oregon and California the plant is found below 4,000 feet in elevation. In New Mexico, Arizona and Colorado the plants tend to range between 4,000 feet and 6,500 feet in elevation. This plant is quite common in California and less common in New Mexico and Arizona.  It is a close relative of  Rhamnus purshiana.
Warnings: Avoid use in cases of intestinal disease that is inflammatory in nature.
Medicinal Uses :
Collect the bark from large limbs or from the trunk while it is still green. This can be done by making shallow cuts around the diameter and lateral cuts every few inches and peel the bark off. One the bark has been peel, it can be strung on a wire to dry in the shade. In the case of Coffee Berry, the bark needs to be heat treated before use. After it is dry you can place it in an oven on very low for two days, or place it in the full sun for 3 or 4 days. If you try to use it without heat treating it will be very irritating to the intestinal tract. Coffee Berry is a laxative. A teaspoon of the chopped bark boiled in a pint of water for 10 minutes should be a starting dose. You can ajust the dose from there, by increasing the bark or decreasing the bark. It is also a useful treatment for inflammmatory rheumatism. To use it for this boil a tablespoon of the bark in a pint of water and drink it in 4 doses throughout the day. The bark is also a mild liver stimulant and will increase bile secretions.
Medical Plants of the Moutain West2nd Edition, by Michael Moore, pages 90-91; Publisher: Museum of New Mexico Press, Copyright 2003, ISBN: 978-0-89013-454-2
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#140(b)
Common Name: Carolina Buckthorn, Indian Cherry (Rhamnus carolinianus)

Appearance and Habitat: This small, deciduous tree or shrub, usually 12-15 ft. tall, can reach 20 ft. in height with leaves that stay green into late fall. Leaves up to 5 inches long, with a petiole as much as 1/2 inch long; blade oval to elliptic, sometimes narrow, pointed at the tip and tapered or rounded at the base, margins smooth or with very small, rounded teeth, veins prominent, especially on the lower surface; upper surface of blade smooth, bright green. Flowers not showy, yellowish, in small clusters at the bases of the leaves, opening in May and June. Fruit fleshy, 1/4 inch or more in diameter, red, turning black when ripe. Songbirds and other wildlife consume the berries, which apparently have medicinal properties but can be toxic. Although called a buckthorn, this species has no spines. It was discovered in South Carolina, hence the common and Latin species names.(1)Rich woods, sheltered slopes, borders of streams and limestone ridges,swamps and low ground in Eastern N. America – Virginia to Florida west to Texas and Nebraska. A deciduous tree growing to 12 m (39ft 4in) at a slow rate. It is hardy to zone 6. It is in flower in May, and the seeds ripen in September.(2)
Edible Uses: Fruit – raw or cooked. The fruit has a thin rather dry flesh with a sweet and agreeable flavour. The fruit is about 7 – 10mm in diameter and contains 2 – 4 small seeds. Some caution is advised, see the notes above on toxicity.(3)
Medicinal Uses :
A tea made from the bark is emetic and strongly laxative. It is used in the treatment of constipation with nervous or muscular atony of the intestines. An infusion of the wood has been used in the treatment of jaundice(4)
Foot Notes:
(1)http://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=FRCA13
Foot Notes:
(2, 3, 4)http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Rhamnus+carolinianus
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#140(c)
Common Name: Cascara Sagrada, Cascara Berry (Rhamnus purshiana)

Appearance and Habitat:
Rich bottom lands and sides of canyons, usually in coniferous forests in Western N. America – British Columbia to California. An evergreen tree growing to 10 m (32ft) by 6 m (19ft). It is hardy to zone 7. It is in leaf 12-Jan It is in flower from May to June, and the seeds ripen in October.
Warnings: There is the suggestion that this species could be mildly poisonous. Excessive use can cause cramps and diarrhea. Linit treatment to 8 to 10 days. Long term use can be habit forming. Fresh Cascara can cause bloody diarrhea and vomiting. It should be aged for at least 1 year or heat treated. Do not use on children.
Edible Uses: Fruit – raw or cooked. A thin rather juicy flesh. It is sometimes eaten. There is some debate as to whether the fruit is edible or slightly toxic. The fruit is about 10mm in diameter and contains 2 – 3 small seeds. An extract of the bark, with the bitterness removed (by drying?) is a common flavouring for soft drinks, baked goods and ice cream.
Medicinal Uses :
Cascara sagrada is widely used as a gentle laxative that restores tone to the bowel muscles and thus makes repeated doses unnecessary. It is often sold in chemists etc. The bark is used, this is harvested on a commercial basis from wild trees and plantations in western N. America. It should be harvested in the autumn or spring at least 12 months before it is used medicinally, in order to allow the more violent purgative effect to be mollified with age. Three year old bark is considered to be the best age. It is considered suitable for delicate and elderly persons and is very useful in cases of chronic constipation. The bark also has tonic properties, promoting gastric digestion and appetite. As well as its uses as a laxative, it is taken internally in the treatment of digestive complaints, haemorrhoids, liver problems and jaundice. This remedy should be used with caution since in excess it causes vomiting and diarrhoea. It should not be prescribed for pregnant or lactating women, or patients with intestinal obstruction. An infusion of the bark is sometimes painted over finger nails in the hope that the bitter taste will deter the person from biting their nails. The German Commission E Monographs, a therapeutic guide to herbal medicine, approve Rhamnus purshiana for constipation.
http://www.pfaf.org/user/plant.aspx?latinname=Rhamnus+purshiana
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#141
Common Name: Wild Grape
Latin Name: Vitis acerifolia, V. aestivalis, V arizonica, V. californica, V. cinerea , V. labrusca, V. monticola, V. mustangensis, V. palmata, V. riparia, V. rotundifolia, V. rupestris, V. vulpina
Family: Vitaceae
Range:
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=VITIS
All States except Hawaii and Alaska; In Canada; Manitoba to Nova Scotia. This is the main database for usda.
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=VIAC2 Colorado, Kansas, New Mexico, Texas and Oklahoma. (Vitis acerifolia)
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=VIAE All States east of the Mississippi R. and along the west bank, plus Nebraska, Kansas, Oklahoma, Texas and California; In Canada; Ontario(Vitis aestivalis)
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=VIAR2 Nevada, Utah, Arizona, New Mexico and Texas. (Vitis arizonica)
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=VICA5 California and Oregon (Vitis californica)
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=VICI2> All States south of the Ohio R. and east of the Mississippi R. plus Pennsylvania, Maryland, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Iowa to Louisiana, Nebraska to Texas. (Vitis cinerea)
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=VILA8 All States east of the Mississippi R., except Florida, plus Louisiana and Utah; In Canada; Ontario, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia(Vitis labrusca
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=VIMO2 New Mexico and Texas (Vitis monticola)
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=VIMU2 Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas, Louisiana and Alabama. (Vitis mustangensis)
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=VIPA7 Texas, Oklahoma, Missouri, Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, Florida, Tennessee, Kentucky, Illinois, Indiana, New Jersey and Connecticut. (Vitis palmata)
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=VIRI All States north of the Ohio R. and north of Pennsylvania and New Jersey plus Maryland, W Virginia, Virginia, N. Carolina, Kentucky, Tennessee, Minnesota to Louisiana, North Dakota to Oklahoma, Montana, Wyoming, Colorado, Washington and Oregon; In Canada; Manitoba to Quebec, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia (Vitis riparia)
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=VIRU2 All States along the Mississippi R. as far north as Illinois and Missouri, plus Indiana, W. Virginia, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Alabama, Oklahoma, Texas and California. (Vitis rupestris)
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=VIVU All States on the east bank of the Mississippi River, except Wisconsin, Connecticut, Vermont, New Hampshire and Maine, plus Iowa to Louisiana, and Nebraska to Texas; In Canada; Ontario. (Vitis vulpina)
Photos: (Click on Latin Name after Common Name.)
Warnings: None
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#141(a)
Common Name: Mapleleaf Grape, Panhandle Grape, Bush Grape (Vitis acerifolia)

Appearance and Habitat: Open woodlands, hillsides, slopes, steam, river banks and dunes. The fruit is purple and the flowers are white and bloom May to June.(1)Ravines and sandy shores, stream bottoms and rocky slopes in Texas, usually scrambling over rocks and shrubs. Southern N. America – Texas to Kansas and Colorado. A deciduous climber growing to 10 m (32ft 10in). It is hardy to zone 6. It is in flower from Jun to July, and the seeds ripen from Sep to October.(2)
Edible Uses:Fruit – raw or dried for winter use. A sweet flavour. The fruit is about 16mm in diameter. Young leaves are wrapped around other foods and then baked, they impart a pleasant flavour. Young tendrils – raw or cooked.(3)
Medicinal Uses :
None(4)
Foot Notes:
(1)http://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=VIAC2
Foot Notes:
(2, 3, 4)http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Vitis+acerifolia
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#141(b)
Common Name: Summer Grape (Vitis aestivalis)

Appearance and Habitat: Dry woods, thickets, stream bottom woods, usually on sandy soil in Texas. Southern and Eastern N. America – Ontario to Alabama. Locally nautralized in Europe. A deciduous climber growing to 20 m (65ft 7in) at a fast rate. It is hardy to zone 3. It is in flower from Jun to July, and the seeds ripen from Sep to October.
Edible Uses:Fruit – raw, cooked in jellies, jams, pies etc or dried for later use. Agreeably flavoured. The taste is best after a frost.The dried fruits are eaten as snacks or used in baked goods. The fruit is about 8mm in diameter and is produced in fairly large bunches. Leaves – cooked. Young leaves are wrapped around other foods and then baked, they impart a pleasant flavour. A sweet watery sap is obtained from the stem. Used as a refreshing drink. Young tendrils – raw or cooked
Medicinal Uses :
The leaves are hepatic. They have been used in the treatment of the liver. The wilted leaves have been applied as a poultice to the breasts to draw away soreness after the birth of a child. A decoction of the leaves and stems has been taken in the treatment of stomach aches, fevers and headaches. An infusion of the bark has been used to treat urinary complaints.
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Vitis+aestivalis
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#141(c)
Common Name: Canyon Grape (Vitis arizonica)

Appearance and Habitat: Canyon or Arizona grape is a shrubby, low-climbing vine with hairy stems; heart-shaped to shallowly three-lobed, leaves; small, fragrant, greenish flowers; and sweet, juicy, black berries. Branched, woody vine, with shredding, peeling bark; clambers over rocks, shrubs, trees. The fleshy grapes are relished by birds, small mammals, and humans, in spite of the large seeds.(1)Streamsides and in canyons, often climbing into trees, 600 – 2260 meters in Arizona and Utah. A deciduous climber growing to 5 m (16ft 5in). It is hardy to zone 6. It is in flower from Jun to July, and the seeds ripen from Sep to October.(2)
Edible Uses:Fruit – raw or dried for winter use. The fruit is fairly small, but it is quite luscious. The fruit is about 10mm in diameter and is borne in bunches. Leaves – raw. Chewed to allay thirst. Young leaves are wrapped around other foods and then baked, they impart a pleasant flavour. Young tendrils – raw or cooked. (3)
Medicinal Uses :
None(4)
Foot Notes:
(1)http://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=VIAR2
Foot Notes:
(2, 3, 4)http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Vitis+arizonica
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#141(d)
Common Name: California Wild Grape, Western Wild Grape (Vitis californica )

Appearance and Habitat: This is a deciduous vine to 30 ft. that, without support, makes a nice ground cover. Stems have shreddy bark and the leaves are roundish and somewhat 3-lobed. Fragrant, greenish-yellow flowers are followed by clusters of small, edible, purple grapes.(1)Stream banks and canyons below 1200 meters in South-western N. America – Oregaon to California. It is hardy to zone 7 and is not frost tender. It is in flower from Jun to July, and the seeds ripen from Sep to October. (2)
Edible Uses:Fruit – raw, cooked or dried for winter use. It can also be made into jellies, pies etc. The fruit is quite juicy but is very small. The fruit is about 8mm in diameter, but it has a thin flesh and is of little value even in America for its fruit. Young leaves are wrapped around other foods and then baked, they impart a pleasant flavour. Young tendrils – raw or cooked. A pleasantly sour snack when eaten raw.(3)
Medicinal Uses :
None(4)
Foot Notes:
(1)http://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=VICA5
Foot Notes:
(2, 3, 4)http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Vitis+californica
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#141(e)
Common Name: Spanish Grape (Vitis cinerea )

Appearance and Habitat: Woodlands, stream bottom woods in Southern N. America -Texas, New Mexico, Arkansas. A deciduous climber growing to 10 m (32ft 10in). It is hardy to zone 7. It is in flower from Jun to July, and the seeds ripen from Aug to September.
Edible Uses: Fruit – raw or dried for winter use. A rich pleasant flavour. The fruit is rather small, but it is borne in very large clusters. It has a slightly bitter flavour, but is pleasant when fully ripe. Young leaves are wrapped around other foods and then baked, they impart a pleasant flavour. Young tendrils – raw or cooked.
Medicinal Uses :
None
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Vitis+cinerea
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#141(f)
Common Name: Fox Grape (Vitis labrusca )

Appearance and Habitat: Bloom color: white, yellow, green and brown. A perennial vine of the woodland and forest edge.(1)Wet or dry thickets ad woodland borders in Eastern N. America – Maine to S. Carolina and Tennessee. Locally naturalized in Europe. A climber growing to 15 m (49ft 3in) at a fast rate. It is hardy to zone 7 and is not frost tender. It is in flower from May to July, and the seeds ripen from Sep to October.(2)
Edible Uses:Fruit – raw or dried for winter use. The fruit can also be made into pies, preserves etc. A distinctive musky aroma and taste that is not acceptable to many people. The fruit is best after a frost. Sweetish, it contains 6.6 – 16.6% sugars. The fruit is up to 2cm in diameter and is produced in fairly large bunches. Young leaves – cooked. A pleasant acid flavour, they are cooked as greens or can be wrapped around other foods and then baked, when they impart a pleasant flavour. Young tendrils – raw or cooked. Sap. Best harvested in the spring or early summer, it has a sweet flavour and makes a pleasant drink. The sap should not be harvested in quantity or it will weaken the plant. An oil is obtained from the seed. This would only really be a viable crop if large quantities of grapes were being grown for wine.(3)
Medicinal Uses :
The leaves are hepatic. An infusion has been used in the treatment of diarrhoea, hepatitis, stomach aches, fevers, headaches and thrush. Externally, the leaves are poulticed and applied to sore breasts, rheumatic joints and headaches. The wilted leaves have been applied as a poultice to the breasts to draw away soreness after the birth of a child. An infusion of the bark has been used to treat urinary complaints.(4)
Foot Notes:
(1)http://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=VILA8
Foot Notes:
(2, 3, 4) http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Vitis+labrusca
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#141(g)
Common Name: Sweet Mountain Grape, Champin Grape (Vitis monticola )

Appearance and Habitat: A climbing vine growing in soils underlain with limestone. Similar to the Spanish Grape (Vitis cinerea var. helleri) but with smaller leaves and shorter flower clusters. Leaf blades as broad as long, up to 4 inches in either direction, but usually less, roughly triangular to broadly heart shaped. Flowers in typically forked clusters up to 3 inches long, blossoming in May and June. Grapes up to 1/2 inch in diameter, in compact bunches, ripening in August and September, sweet tasting. Commonly black when completely ripe. But also reddish forms. (1) Rich damp woodland soils, stream bottoms and limestone areas in Southern N. America. It is hardy to zone 6. It is in flower from Jun to July, and the seeds ripen from Sep to October.(2)
Edible Uses:Fruit – raw or dried for winter use. Large, thin-skinned with a tender juicy sweet pulp. Small and sweet according to another report. The fruit is about 12mm in diameter and is borne in bunches. Leaves – cooked. Young leaves are wrapped around other foods and then baked, they impart a pleasant flavour. Young tendrils – raw or cooked .(3)
Medicinal Uses :
None(4)
Foot Notes:
(1) http://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=VIMO2
Foot Notes:
(2, 3, 4) http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Vitis+monticola
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#141(h)
Common Name: Mustang Grape (Vitis mustangensis )

Appearance and Habitat: A common and easily recognized grape with a white, velvety surface on the lower side of the leaves. A vine climbing over shrubs and into trees and often shading their leaves. Leaves in two forms: one form unlobed or shallowly lobed, and the other form deeply lobed, with the latter less common and on rapidly growing shoots. The lower surface of the unlobed leaves often concave. Grapes up to 3/4 inch in diameter, few to the bunch, ripening in August and September to dark purple, and usually bitter, even irritating, but popular with makers of homemade wine.(1)Rich damp woodland soils, often on limestone in Southern N. America – Oklahoma and Arkansas to Texas. A deciduous climber growing to 10 m (32ft 10in). It is hardy to zone 5. It is in flower from Jun to July, and the seeds ripen from Sep to October.(2)
Edible Uses:Fruit – raw, cooked or dried for winter use. Tough skinned, they are used mainly for pies and jellies.A disagreeable flavour. The fruit is about 16mm in diameter and is borne in bunches. Young leaves are wrapped around other foods and then baked, they impart a pleasant flavour. Young tendrils – raw or cooked.(3)
Medicinal Uses :
None(4)
Foot Notes:
(1) http://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=VIMU2
Foot Notes:
(2, 3, 4) http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Vitis+mustangensis

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#141(i)
Common Name: Red Grape (Vitis palmata )

Appearance and Habitat: Sandy banks, rocky places, borders of sloughs and ponds in Southern and Central N. America – Illinois, Missouri and Arkansas. A deciduous climber growing to 20 m (65ft 7in). It is hardy to zone 5. It is in flower from Jun to July, and the seeds ripen from Sep to October.
Edible Uses:Fruit – raw or dried for winter use. A sweet flavour when mature. The fruit is up to 10mm in diameter and is carried in small bunches. Young leaves are wrapped around other foods and then baked, they impart a pleasant flavour. Young tendrils – raw or cooked. Used as a snack.
Medicinal Uses :
None 
 http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Vitis+palmata
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#141(j)
Common Name:Riverbank Grape (Vitis riparia)

Appearance and Habitat:
This deciduous vine trails or climbs 35 ft. or more. Reddish-brown, exfoliating bark; small, loose spikes of yellow-green, fragrant flowers; and bluish-black berries are the plant’s showy characteristics.(1)Riverbanks, bottomlands, rich thickets and woodland margins in Eastern and Central N. America. Locally naturalized in Europe. A deciduous climber growing to 15 m (49ft 3in) at a fast rate. It is hardy to zone 2 and is not frost tender. It is in flower from May to July, and the seeds ripen from Aug to September.(2)
Edible Uses:Fruit – raw or dried for later use. Juicy and somewhat acid. The taste is best after a frost. The fruit is about 6 – 12mm in diameter and is carried in fairly large bunches. Leaves – cooked. Young leaves are wrapped around other foods and then baked, they impart a pleasant flavour. Young tendrils – raw or cooked. Sap – raw. A sweet flavour, it is used as a drink. The sap can be harvested in the spring and early summer, though it should not be taken in quantity or it will weaken the plant(3)
Medicinal Uses :
None(4)
Foot Notes:
(1) http://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=VIRI
Foot Notes:
(2, 3, 4) http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Vitis+riparia
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#141(k)
Common Name: Muscadine, Scuppernong Grape (Vitis rotundifolia)

Appearance and Habitat: Muscadine is a vigorous, high climbing or prostrate deciduous vine sometimes reaching lengths in excess of 90 ft. Large leaves are round and shiny with broad, blunt teeth. Shiny, purple-black to bronze berries ripen in Sept. and Oct. and fall promptly. The bark of this wild grape is not exfoliating. The berries make good jelly.(1)Found in Southern N. America. It is in flower from Jun to July, and the seeds ripen from Sep to October.(2)
Edible Uses:Fruit – raw or dried for later use. Thin-skinned with an acid flavour, it can be eaten raw when fully ripe. The fruit is borne in bunches, which makes harvesting easier. Young leaves – cooked as greens or wrapped around other foods and then baked, when they impart a pleasant flavour. Young tendrils – raw or cooked. Sap – used as a drink. It is best harvested in the spring or early summer, but should not be taken in quantity or it will weaken the plant.(3)
Medicinal Uses :
None(4)
Foot Notes:
(1) http://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=VIRO3
Foot Notes:
(2, 3, 4) http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Vitis+rotundifolia
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#141(l)
Common Name: Sand Grape (Vitis rupestris)

Appearance and Habitat: Sandy banks, shores and hills in Southern Central N. America – Pennsylvania to Missouri and Texas . Naturalized in Europe. A deciduous climber growing to 2 m (6ft 7in). It is in flower from May to June, and the seeds ripen from Sep to October.
Edible Uses: Fruit – raw or dried for winter use. Very sweet. A pleasant flavour. The fruit is about 6 – 12mm in diameter and is borne in reasonable sized bunches. Leaves – cooked. Young leaves are wrapped around other foods and then baked, they impart a pleasant flavour. Young tendrils – raw or cooked
Medicinal Uses :
None
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Vitis+rupestris
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#141(m)
Common Name: Frost Grape (Vitis vulpina)

Appearance and Habitat: Low woods, stream banks, bases of bluffs and thickets in Central and Eastern N. America – New Brusnwick to Manitoba, south to Maryland, Arkansas and Colorado. A deciduous climber growing to 25 m (82ft 0in). It is hardy to zone 5 and is not frost tender. It is in flower from Jun to July, and the seeds ripen from Sep to October.
Edible Uses: Fruit – raw or dried for winter use. Very acid when it first ripens, it becomes sweet and edible after exposure to frost. The fruit is 5 – 10mm in diameter and is carried in small bunches. Young leaves are wrapped around other foods and then baked, they impart a pleasant flavour. Young tendrils – raw or cooked
Medicinal Uses :
The leaves are hepatic. They have been used in the treatment of the liver. The wilted leaves have been applied as a poultice to the breasts to draw away soreness after the birth of a child. An infusion of the bark has been used to treat urinary complaints. An infusion of the roots has been taken in the treatment of rheumatism and diabetes
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Vitis+vulpina
Reproduced, in part, (as well as previous postings under this title) in accordance with Section 107 of title 17 of the Copyright Law of the United States relating to fair-use and is for the purposes of criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research.

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