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Medical disclaimer: always check with a physician before consuming wild plants, and make positive identification in the field using a good source such as Medicinal Plants of the Mountain West.  Michael Moore also has a glossary of medical terms in his books, and maps in later editions. ) 

(If you haven’t checked lately, the main website www.keystoliberty.wordpress.com is now on survival)

#107
Common Name: Grindelia, Gumweed, Tarweed, Rosinweed
Latin Name: Grindelia arizonica, G. camporum, G. integrifolia, G. nana, G. squarrosa, G. stricta
Family: compositae
Native American Names: Sanaka para (Shoshone), Aks-Peis (Blackfeet), Wahanana (Washoe)
Range:
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=GRIND main database-all states except Hawaii, Florida, Georgia, N. and S. Carolina – In Canada all provinces except Yukon, Nunavut, New Foundland, Nova Scotia, Labrador, New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island

http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=GRAR2  Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona and Texas(Grindelia arizonica)
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=GRCA  California, Nevada, Pennsylvania and Massachusetts(Grindelia camporum)
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=GRLA3  New Mexico, Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas, Missouri,Arkansas, Louisiana, Wisconsin, Ohio, Kentucky, Virginia, Tennessee, Mississippi, Alabama and Connecticut (Grindelia lanceolata)
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=GRNAWashington, Oregon, Idaho, Montana, California, Utah and Nevada (Grindelia nana)
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=GRNU California, Arizona, Utah, New Mexico, Colorado, Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas and Missouri (Grindelia nuda)
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=GRSQ  all Canadian Provinces mentioned above, all states except Louisiana, Florida, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, N. and S. Carolina(Grindelia squarrosa)
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=GRST3 Washington, Oregon, California (Grindelia stricta)
Photos: (Click on latin name after common name)
Warnings: Large doses used medicinally can irritate the kidneys. On PFAF
#107(a)
Common Name: Gumweed, (Grindelia camporum )
Appearance and Habitat:
Dry banks, rocky fields and plains, low alkaline ground in California. An annual/perennial growing to 1.2 m (4ft) by 0.8 m (2ft 7in). It is hardy to zone 8. It is in flower from Jul to August.

Edible Uses: None
Medicinal Uses: Gumplant was used by the native North American Indians to treat bronchial problems and also skin afflictions such as reactions to poison ivy. It is still used in modern herbalism where it is valued especially as a treatment for bronchial asthma and for states where phlegm in the airways impedes respiration. In addition, it is believed to desensitize the nerve endings in the bronchial tree and slow the heart rate, thus leading to easier breathing. The herb is contraindicated for patients with kidney or heart complaints. The dried leaves and flowering tops are antiasthmatic, anti-inflammatory, antispasmodic, expectorant and sedative. The principal use of this herb is in the treatment of bronchial catarrh, especially when there is an asthmatic tendency, it is also used to treat whooping cough and cystitis. The active principle is excreted from the kidneys, and this sometimes produces signs of renal irritation. Externally, the plant is used to treat burns, poison ivy rash, dermatitis, eczema and skin eruptions. The plant is harvested when in full bloom and can be used fresh as a poultice or dried for infusions etc. A homeopathic remedy is prepared from the leaves and flowering stems
Foot Notes: all http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Grindelia+camporum
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#107(b)
Common Name: Rosinweed, (Grindelia lanceolata )

Appearance and Habitat: Dry soils on prairies and roadsides. Calcareous soils in Texas. Central and Southern N. America – Tennessee to Missouri, Kansas, Louisiana and Texas. A Biennial/perennial growing to 1.5 m (5ft). It is hardy to zone 5. It is in flower from Jul to September.
Edible Uses: The following reports are for the related G. squarrosa, they probably also apply to this species. The fresh or dried leaves can be used to make an aromatic, slightly bitter but pleasing tea. A sticky resinous sap that covers the leaves can be used as a chewing gum substitute.
Medicinal Uses: The following reports are for the related G. squarrosa, they also apply to this species. Rosin weed was used by the native North American Indians to treat bronchial problems and also skin afflictions such as reactions to poison ivy. It is still used in modern herbalism where it is valued especially as a treatment for bronchial asthma and for states where phlegm in the airways impedes respiration. In addition, it is believed to desensitize the nerve endings in the bronchial tree and slow the heart rate, thus leading to easier breathing. The plant merits investigation as a treatment for asthma. The herb is contraindicated for patients with kidney or heart complaints. The dried leaves and flowering tops are antiasthmatic, anti-inflammatory, antispasmodic, expectorant and sedative. The principal use of this herb is in the treatment of bronchial catarrh, especially when there is an asthmatic tendency, it is also used to treat whooping cough and cystitis. The active principle is excreted from the kidneys, and this sometimes produces signs of renal irritation. Externally, the plant is used as a poultice to treat burns, poison ivy rash, dermatitis, eczema and skin eruptions. The plant is harvested when in full bloom and can be used fresh as a poultice or dried for infusions etc. A fluid extract is prepared by placing the freshly gathered leaves and flowers in a small quantity of simmering water for about 15 minutes. A homeopathic remedy is prepared from the leaves and flowering stems
Foot Notes:
all http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Grindelia+lanceolata
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#107(c)
Common Name: Curlycup Gumweed, (Grindelia squarrosa )

Appearance and Habitat: Stout erect stem bears several branches with yellow daisy-like flower heads. This tough but short-lived perennial, a common invader of overgrazed rangeland in the West, has now spread to dry waste places in the East. Because of its bitter taste it is not eaten by cattle. Indians used its flowers and leaves for treating bronchitis and asthma and for healing sores. The powdered flower heads were once used in cigarettes to relieve asthma. (1) Prairies, plains and dry banks in N. America – Minnesota to British Columbia, south to California and Texas. A biennial/perennial growing to 1 m (3ft 3in). It is hardy to zone 3. It is in flower from Jul to September. Additional Warning: The plant containsthe carcinogen safrole.(2)Edible Uses: The fresh or dried leaves can be used to make an aromatic, slightly bitter but pleasing tea. A sticky resinous sap that covers the leaves can be used as a chewing gum substitute. (3)
Medicinal Uses: Rosin weed was used by the native North American Indians to treat bronchial problems and also skin afflictions such as reactions to poison ivy. It is still used in modern herbalism where it is valued especially as a treatment for bronchial asthma and for states where phlegm in the airways impedes respiration. In addition, it is believed to desensitize the nerve endings in the bronchial tree and slow the heart rate, thus leading to easier breathing. The plant merits investigation as a treatment for asthma. The herb is contraindicated for patients with kidney or heart complaints. The dried leaves and flowering tops are antiasthmatic, anti-inflammatory, antispasmodic, expectorant and sedative. The principal use of this herb is in the treatment of bronchial catarrh, especially when there is an asthmatic tendency, it is also used to treat whooping cough and cystitis. The active principle is excreted from the kidneys, and this sometimes produces signs of renal irritation. Externally, the plant is used as a poultice to treat burns, poison ivy rash, dermatitis, eczema and skin eruptions. The plant is harvested when in full bloom and can be used fresh as a poultice or dried for infusions etc. A fluid extract is prepared by placing the freshly gathered leaves and flowers in a small quantity of simmering water for about 15 minutes. A homeopathic remedy is prepared from the leaves and flowering stems.(4) Native American Tribes would dry the upper third of the plant and the sticky buds and use them to make tea for colds and also for smallpox. They would also take the tea for liver problems. (5) 
Foot Notes:
(1) http://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=GRSQ
Foot Notes: (2, 3, 4) http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Grindelia+squarrosa
Foot Notes:
(5) Indian Uses of Native Plants by Edith Murphey, pages 37, 43, 45 , Publisher: Meyerbooks Copy right 1990; ISBN 0-916638-15-4 – Along with Native American Names. ************************************

#107(d)
Common Name: Great Valley Gumweed, (Grindelia stricta )

Appearance and Habitat: By the coast in sunny well-drained situations. Thrives in dry areas and salty plains in Southwestern N. America. A perennial growing to 0.6 m (2ft). It is hardy to zone 7. It is in flower from May to September.
Edible Uses: Leaves – raw.
Medicinal Uses: The leaves and flowering tops are antiphlogistic, antispasmodic, balsamic, demulcent, expectorant, sedative, stomachic and a vascular tonic. Blood purifier. The plant is applied externally as a compress on inflamed or irritated areas of the skin. Used internally, it slows down the heartbeat and reduces the stimulation of the nerve endings in the air passages that causes coughing – it is therefore extremely effective as a calming agent in the treatment of asthma. The fluid extract is prepared by placing the freshly gathered leaves and flowers in a small quantity of simmering water for about 15 minutes. The plant is used to treat people affected by poison-ivy
Foot Notes:
all http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Grindelia+robusta
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(Now for Michael Moore who covers more species)

Photos: Not already given but covered by Michael Moore. ( Grindelia arizonica)(Grindelia integrifolia)(Grindelia nana) No photos available for Grindelia nuda.
Appearance and Habitat:
The leaves are green to blue green, spade shaped and slightly toothed. When in bloom the plant is about 3 feet high. It has many stems with yellow flowers. Both the young flowers and the buds are covered with a thick milky exudate that smells like balsamic. It is found in gravelly areas, in disturbed earth and along roadways from 3,000 to 8,000 feet in the west. The flowers are yellow.
Edible Uses: The young leaves make a slightly bitter, but aromatic tea for drinking.
Medicinal Uses: Collect the buds and flower heads when in early bloom. The leaves and flowers can each be used for tea or for tincturing. The tea works well for bronchitis and as an antispasmodic for a hacking cough. The tincture is very useful for bladder and uethra infections. Either a poultice made from crushed flowers or external use of the tincture is a good treatment for poison oak inflammations. For a poultice, mash the plant with some warm water and apply where it is needed. To make a tincture use the flowers or buds, if the plant is fresh use 1 part plant to 2 parts 70% vodka, for dried flower tops use 1 part to 5 parts alcohol. You can take from 15 to 40 drops up to 5 times a day as an expectorant, bladder infections, as a mild sedative or for urethra infections. Grindelia was an official drug plant for asthma until 1960.
Foot Notes:
all Medicinal Plants Of the Mountain West  by Michael Moore, 1st Edition, page 80 – 82, publisher:  Museum of New Mexico Press ; copy right 1979  ISBN 0-89013-104-X
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#108
Common Name: Chaparral, Greasewood, Creosote Bush, Gobernadora, Hediondilla
Latin Name: Larrea tridentata
Family: Zygophyllaceae
Native American Names: Ya-temp (Moapa Paiutes), Geroop (Other Paiutes), Ya tombe (Death Valley Shoshone)(1)
Range: http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=LATR2California, Nevada, Arizona, Utah, New Mexico and Texas. 
Photos:  (here)
Warnings: Acute hepatitis associated with oral use. Contact dermatitis also reported. Not considered safe as a herbal remedy(2)I personally believe this warning is B.S. Myself, for a short period of time, and my uncle, for many years took the plant as a cancer treatment. He died of old age not acute hepatitus. Many cancer cells have been found to be plant physiology. Most plants do not grow under Chaparral.
Appearance and Habitat: Creosote-bush is a 3-5 ft., evergreen shrub which can reach 10 ft. and has numerous flexible stems usually arising from the base at an angle. Its slender, irregularly branching stems bear tiny, rich-green, aromatic leaflets. The small, compound leaves, 1/5–2/5 inch long, are composed of 2 leaflets. They are opposite, united at the base, pointed at the tip, dark to yellowish-green, strong-scented, and often sticky with resin. These provide a background for small but prolific, yellow, velvety flowers, followed by fluffy, white fruit. The flowers are inconspicuous except under favorable conditions, when they are prominent, giving the bush a yellowish cast. They are 1/4–1/2 inch long, with 5 petals, 10 stemens, and 1 pistil. Stems are gray with dark nodes, giving a jointed appearance. Creosote Bush is the most characteristic species of the hot deserts of North America. Its pungence fills the air following rains. Decoctions from its leaves are used as antiseptics and emetics. Many “bunches” of plants are actually clones. The foliage hides species of grasshoppers, praying mantids, and crickets that occur only on this plant. Leafy galls caused by a fly, the Creosote Gall Midge (Asphondylia spp.) are often numerous. (3) They are many branched bushes up to 12 feet tall, but usually chest high. In moist conditions the foliage is a greasy yellow green, but olive drab during a drought or freezing. The leaves are small and curled. The flowers are yellow and cover the bushes after a good rain anytime of year. The flowers mature into fuzzy round capsules. It habitats the southwestern deserts to 5,500 feet outside Albuquerque, New Mexico; and below it is very common and spreads deep in into Mexico. (4)
Edible Uses: The flower buds are pickled in vinegar and used as a caper substitute. The stems and leaves are a tea substitute. The twigs are chewed to alleviate thirst. A resin is obtained from the leaves and twigs, it delays or prevents oils and fats from becoming rancid. (5)
Medicinal Uses: Creosote bush was widely used by various North American Indian tribes. A decoction of the leaves was used to treat diarrhoea and stomach troubles whilst the young twigs were used to treat toothache and a poultice of the leaves was used to treat chest complaints and as a wash for skin problems. It continued to be widely used as a treatment for rheumatic disease, venereal infections, urinary infections and certain types of cancer, especially leukaemia until its sale was banned in North America due to concern over its potential toxic effect upon the liver. There have been a number of cases of acute or sub-acute hepatitis attributed to the use of this herb and so its internal use is not recommended until further research has been carried out. A tea made from the leaves is used as an expectorant and pulmonary antiseptic. Some N. American Indian tribes heated the shoot tips of this plant and dripped the sap (probably the resin) into tooth cavities to treat toothache. (6) The leaves were steeped for tea and drunk by women to relieve cramps and other irregularities (7) It contains 18 distinct flavone and flavonol aglycones, a dihdroflavonol, larreic acid, two guaiuretic acid, lignins including hydroguaiuretic acid, and several quercetin bioflavonoids. Chaparral inhibits aerobic combustion, and unless the oils that the plant gives off into surrounding soil has been thoroughly washed away, it inhibits seeds from burning their sugars and sprouting. When applied to the skin as a tea, tincture, or salve, Chaparral slows down the rate of bacterial growth and kills it with its antimicrobial activity. Collect well-foliaged plants. For use external use, the older plants work best, but internal use pick the bright green younger plants. You can use a blender to grind up the leaves, flowers and seeds, but it works better if you freeze the plant first. For a tincture use 1 part plant to 5 parts 75% alcohol, if you plan on taking it internally use vodka. A salve can be made by grinding up one part plant to 7 parts olive oil, set it aside for a week. To thicken the salve, warm the mixture, put it back in the blender, and add 1 1/2 parts of beeswax. It makes a very useful first aid dressing for both short term and long term for skin abrasions and other injuries. The tea is nearly undrinkable. It has a strong beneficial effect on impaired liver function in capsule or tincture form. Clinical trials have shown that it aids people who manufacture elevated LDL’s (Low Density Lipids) and VLDL’s (Very Low Density Lipids) and cause hardening of the arteries and arteriosclerosis. In a recent study on radical oxygen chemistry, Chaparral has been shown to contain compounds that inhibit damage to the liver and lungs from free radicals. It is beneficial to hepatocytes of the liver. It is useful in joint pain, allergies, autoimmune diseases. For capsules use #00 filled with the powder plant. Some studies show it has reduced some cancers, but in some cases accelerates some cancers.
Foot Notes:
(1, 7)  Indian Uses of Native Plants by Edith Murphey, pages 37, 45, Publisher: Meyerbooks Copy right 1990; ISBN 0-916638-15-4
Foot Notes: (3)http://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=LATR2
Foot Notes:
(2 , 5, 6)
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Larrea+tridentata

Foot Notes: (4, 8) Medicinal Plants of the Desert and Canyon West by Michael Moore, pages 27-29, Published by Museum of New Mexico Press ISBN 978-089013182-4, Copyright 1989
(Contrary to PFAF website, it is still for sale) http://www.herbspro.com/search/products.asp?txtSearch=Chaparra&moreprods=&gclid=CPK2qcXEsKQCFdRU2godwkxJ0w
Reproduced, in part, (as well as previous postings under this title) in accordance with Section 107 of title 17 of the Copyright Law of the United States relating to fair-use and is for the purposes of criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research.

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