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(Medical disclaimer: always check with a physician before consuming wild plants, and make positive identification in the field using a good source such as Medicinal Plants of the Mountain West.) 
#64
Common Name: Joint Fir, Mormon Tea, Squaw Tea, Indian Tea, Joint Fir, Brigham Tea, Popotilllo, Desert Tea, Canutillo, Cowboy Tea
Latin Name: Ephedra spp.
Family Name: Ephedraceae
Range: http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=EPHED main database- Oregon, California, Nevada, Arizona, Utah, New Mexico, Colorado, Wyoming, Oklahoma, Texas
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=EPAS California, Nevada, Arizona, Utah, New Mexico, Texas Ephedra aspera
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=EPNE  California, Oregon, Nevada, Utah, Arizona Ephedra nevadensis
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=EPTO Nevada, Arizona, Utah, New Mexico, Colorado, Texas Ephedra torreyana
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=EPTR
 Califonia, Arizona, New Mexico, Texas Ephedra trifurca
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=EPVI Oregon, California, Nevada, Arizona, Utah, New Mexico, Colorado Ephedra viridis
Photos: (Click on links of latin names after range)
(Plants for A Future lists 4, but all will be covered by Michael Moore after 64(d).)
64(a)
Common Name: Mormon Tea (Ephedra Nevadensis)
Native American Names: Tsurupe (Paiute), Durumbe (Shoshone),  Tu tupe ( Moapa Pauite), Tu tumbe (Death Valley Shoshone) (1)
Appearance and Habitat:A 5 ft. shrub with yellowish-gray, erect-spreading branches. Small, paired leaves split and fall off early leaving a leafless, broom-like shrub. Tiny, individual, yellow to light-brown flowers cluster together to form a cone-like inflorescence. (2) Dry, rocky slopes and hills, rarely in sandy flat areas, at elevations of 700 – 1900 meters in South-western N. America.  An evergreen shrub  is an evergreen Shrub growing to 1.2 m (4ft).  It is hardy to zone 6. It is in leaf 12-Jan It is in flower from Apr to June. The flowers are dioecious (individual flowers are either male or female, but only one sex is to be found on any one plant. (3)
Warnings: None (4)
Edible Uses: Fruit – raw. A sweet but very mild flavour. Seed – cooked. A bitter taste. It can be roasted and ground into a powder and used to make a bread or mush. A delicious tea is made by steeping the green or dried twigs in boiling water until they turn an amber or pink colour. (5)Shoshones parch and coarsely grind the seed for coffee. The slender  twigs are dried and an aromatic tea is used as a beverage. (6)
Medical Uses: The stems are blood purifier, diuretic, febrifuge and tonic. They are beneficial in the treatment of urogenital complaints. An infusion has been used in the treatment of kidney problems, gonorrhoea and the first stages of syphilis. A poultice of the powdered stems has been applied to sores. The stems of most members of this genus contain the alkaloid ephedrine and are valuable in the treatment of asthma and many other complaints of the respiratory system. The whole plant can be used at much lower concentrations than the isolated constituents – unlike using the isolated ephedrine, using the whole plant rarely gives rise to side-effects. Ephedra does not cure asthma but in many cases it is very effective in treating the symptoms and thus making life somewhat easier for the sufferer. The stems can be used fresh or dried and are usually made into a tea, though they can also be eaten raw. The young stems are best if eating them raw, though older stems can be used if a tea is made. The stems can be harvested at any time of the year and are dried for later use. (7)  For treating syphilis dried twigs of Ephdra were mixed with the bark of Antelope Brush and a tea was made was  called Hunabe. (8)
Foot Notes: (1, 6, 8)  Indian Uses of Native Plants by Edith Murphey, pages 17, 47, Publisher: Meyerbooks Copy right 1990; ISBN 0-916638-15-4
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#64(b)
Common Name: Mexican Tea, Torrey’s Jointfir (Ephedra torreyana)
Appearance and Habitat: Dry gravelly or sandy plains, hills and canyons, 900 – 1800 meters in New Mexico.  Dry rocky to sandy areas; 500 – 2,000 meters in Southwestern N. America – Arizona and Colorado south to New Mexico, Texas, and Mexico.  An evergreen shrub growing to 1 m (3ft 3in).   It is in leaf 12-Jan It is in flower from Apr to May. The flowers are dioecious.
Warnings: None
Edible Uses:  An excellent tea is made by boiling the stems for a few minutes and allowing the brew to steep. Fruit – raw or cooked.
Medicinal Uses: This plant has a wide reputation as a cure for syphilis. A decoction of the stems is used, this decoction is also used in treating coughs, bladder and kidney problems and stomach disorders. A decoction of the leaves and stems has been used as a lotion on itchy skin. The stems of most members of this genus contain the alkaloid ephedrine and are valuable in the treatment of asthma and many other complaints of the respiratory system. The whole plant can be used at much lower concentrations than the isolated constituents – unlike using the isolated ephedrine, using the whole plant rarely gives rise to side-effects. Ephedra does not cure asthma but in many cases it is very effective in treating the symptoms and thus making life somewhat easier for the sufferer. The stems can be used fresh or dried and are usually made into a tea, though they can also be eaten raw. The young stems are best if eating them raw, though older stems can be used if a tea is made. The stems can be harvested at any time of the year and are dried for later use.
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#64 (c)
Common Name: Longleaf Jointfir (Ephedra trifurca )
Appearance and Habitat: This is a 1-5 ft. shrub  with yellowish-gray, erect, forked branches. Spine-tipped leaves, in groups of three, split and fall off early leaving a leafless, broom-like shrub. Cones are red-brown.  (1) Dry sandy and rocky places below 600 meters in Creosote and bush scrub, deserts etc.  Dry rocky slopes to flat sandy areas at elevations of 500 to 2000 meters is Southwestern N. America – southern California to Texas and Mexico.  An evergreen shrub growing to 2 m (6ft 7in).  It is in leaf 12-Jan It is in flower from Mar to May. The flowers are dioecious. (2)
Warnings: None (3)
Edible Uses: A tea is made from the branches. Fruit – raw or cooked. (4)
Medicinal Uses: The dried and crushed stems are diuretic.An infusion has been used in the treatment of venereal disease, stomach complaints and kidney problems. The pulverized or boiled stems were also applied externally as a poultice on syphilitic sores by some native North American Indians. They can also be used as a poultice on other skin sores. Unlike many members of the genus, this species is not very rich in the alkaloid ephedrine and so is not used in the treatment of asthma. (5)
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#64(d)
Common Name: Mormon Tea (Ephedra viridis )
Appearance and Habitat: Mormon-tea is a 3 ft. shrub  with numerous yellowish-green branches. Paired, bristle-tipped leaves split and fall off early leaving a leafless, broom-like shrub. Cone-like flowers are light-yellow. (1)  Dry rocky slopes, gravel terraces and canyon walls, often on limestone, at elevations of 800 – 2500 meters.  In Southwestern N. America – California to Colorado and Arizona.  An evergreen shrub  growing to 1.8 m (6ft).  It is hardy to zone 9. It is in leaf 12-Jan It is in flower from Apr to May. The flowers are dioecious.  (2)
Warnings: None (3)
Edible Uses:  Fruit – raw. A sweet flavour. Seed – cooked. A bitter flavour, it is roasted and ground into a powder and used to make a bread or mush. A delicious tea is made by steeping the green or dried twigs in boiling water. The flavour is said to be improved if the stems are roasted first.(4)
Medicinal Uses: This plant has a wide reputation as a cure for syphilis. A strong decoction of the stems was drunk and a poultice of the pulverized or boiled stems applied to the sores. The stems are blood purifier, diuretic and tonic. An infusion has been used in the treatment of coughs and colds, anaemia, rheumatism, stomach ulcers and other disorders, kidney problems. The dried, powdered stems are used as a dressing on sores and burns. The stems of most members of this genus contain the alkaloid ephedrine and are valuable in the treatment of asthma and many other complaints of the respiratory system. The whole plant can be used at much lower concentrations than the isolated constituents – unlike using the isolated ephedrine, using the whole plant rarely gives rise to side-effects. Ephedra does not cure asthma but in many cases it is very effective in treating the symptoms and thus making life somewhat easier for the sufferer. The stems can be used fresh or dried and are usually made into a tea, though they can also be eaten raw. The young stems are best if eating them raw, though older stems can be used if a tea is made. The stems can be harvested at any time of the year and are dried for later use. (5)
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Appearance and Habitat: This plant forms a small to medium sized shrub with numerous jointed needles from 2 to 12 inches long.  One might think it is a dwarf pine tree on first appearance.   The only leaves it has are degenerated to scales at the nodes along the needles.  It is abundant in the Great Basin, Big Bend in Texas, the Four Corner’s area, and the foothills of south central California.  It’s large branches come from a deep rootstock.  The stems vary in color from reddish brown in young shoots to gray in older shoots.  The fruits are green cones that eventually turn brown.  They bloom in early spring to late winter depending on the species.
Medicinal Uses:  This plant can be collected at any time.  Collect the branches and let dry in a paper sack. The fresh tea contains 58,300 ppm of calcium in an ionic state and is perfect for people  suffering with osteoporosis.  For this purpose make sure the tea is freshly brewed.  It will absorp strait into the blood steam and by pass intestinal absorption.   The plant does not contain enough ephedrine for drug use but is perfect as a home remedy for its diuretic effect, its uses as urinary tract astringent and anti inflammatory.  The tea from the plant has been used by Native Americans for over a millenia for urinary tract, respiratory problems and diarrhea.  They have also used it as an external dressing for wounds, but for that make an extremely strong tea.  Some people have found that replacing the tea for coffee in the morning relieves allergies and hayfever.
Foot Notes: Medicinal Plants Of the Mountain West  by Michael Moore, 1st Edition, page 109-110, publisher:  Museum of New Mexico Press ; copy right 1979  ISBN 0-89013-104-X
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# 65
Common Name: Turtle Back, Velvet Turtleback, Gray, Hairybeast Turtleback
Latin Name: psathyrotes ramosissima Psathyrotopsis scaposa, Psathyrotes pilifera, Psathyrotes annua
Family: Asteraceae
Native American Name: Sebu mogoonobu (Paiute)
Range: http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=PSATH main database California, Nevada, Utah, Idaho, Arizona,  
Photos: (Click on links of latin names after range)
Medicinal Uses: Tea from dried leaves used as an eyewash and also for kidney and bladder problems.  The dried plant was  also used for a tooth ache. It was pulled up with its roots and hung to dry.  When someone had a tooth ache they would chew dry bits on the side where the pain was.
Foot Notes:  Indian Uses of Native Plants by Edith Murphey, pages 39, 41, 45, Publisher: Meyerbooks Copy right 1990; ISBN 0-916638-15-4
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#66
Common Name: Pond Lily, water lily
Latin Name:  Nuphar polysepala, lutea, Nuphar advena,  Nuphar polysepala, Nuphar variegata
Family Name: Nymphaeaceae
Range: entire North America in one form or the other http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=NULU main database,  all states, except Hawaii, all of Canada (Nuphar lutea)
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=NULUA all states east of the Mississippi, plus Minnesota, Missouri, Arkansas, Louisiana, Kansas, Oklahoma, Texas (Nuphar advena )
 http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=NULUP Rocky Mountains west including Canada and Alaska.(Nuphar polysepala)
 http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=NULUV all of Canada ans south to Idaho, Montana, Kansas, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Pennslyvania, Maryland (Nuphar variegata )

Photos: (Click on links of latin names after range)
# 66(a)
Common Name: Common Spatterdock (Nuphar advena)
Appearance and Habitat:  Spatterdock plants grow in shallow water and are rooted in the mud. They have large leaves, 4–16 inches across, that are almost round except for the deep, narrow cut a third of the way to the center, where the stout stem  is attached. The leaves of this coarse, rhizomatous aquatic perennial are quite variable and may be wide or rather narrow and submersed or floating; the petioles & peduncles have numerous minute air cavities. Flowers are 1–2 inches across and held above the water by their stout stems. They have 6 sepals,the outer 3 green, the inner 3 yellow and petal-like. The yellow petals are small, numerous, and stamen-like, mixed with the many stamens. The single, yellow, fleshy flower, with its prominent, lobed stigma  is the best known feature. Yellow cow lily can grow in water up to 16 in. deep. (1) Ponds, lakes, sluggish streams and rivers, springs, marshes, ditches, canals, sloughs, and tidal waters from sea level to 450 meters.  Southeastern N. America-Labrador and Nova Scotia, south to Florida, Texas and Utah. It is hardy to zone 3. It is in flower from Jul to August. (2)
Warnings: None (3)
Edible Uses: Root – raw or cooked. The root can be soaked in water in order to remove a bitter taste. After long boiling, it has a taste like sheep’s liver. The root can also be dried and ground into a powder then used as a thickener in soups, or can be added to cereal flours when making bread, cakes etc. Seed – raw or cooked. It can be roasted, then ground into a powder and eaten raw or used to thicken soups etc. The seed can also be toasted like popcorn. (4)
Medicinal Uses: The fresh root is anodyne, astringent and demulcent. The pulverized dried rhizomes have been used to arrest bleeding. A tea made from the roots is used in the treatment of dysentery, diarrhoea etc. A poultice made from the roots is used in the treatment of swellings, boils, tumours, inflamed skin etc. (5)
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# 66 (b)
Common Name: Yellow Pond Lily, Cow Lily (Nuphar lutea)
Appearance and Habitat: The leaves of this coarse, rhizomatous aquatic perennial are quite variable and may be wide or rather narrow and submersed or floating. The single, yellow, fleshy flower, with its prominent, lobed stigma is the best known feature. Yellow pond-lily can grow in water up to 16 in. deep. There are a number of subspecies of Nuphar lutea. (1)  Ponds, lakes, sluggish streams and rivers, springs, marshes, ditches, canals, sloughs, and tidal waters from sea level to 450 meters.  Southeastern N. America-Labrador and Nova Scotia, south to Florida, Texas and Utah. It is hardy to zone 3. It is in flower from Jul to August. (2)
Warnings: None (3)
Edible Uses:  Root – raw or cooked. The root can be soaked in water in order to remove a bitter taste. After long boiling, it has a taste like sheep’s liver. The root can also be dried and ground into a powder then used as a thickener in soups, or can be added to cereal flours when making bread, cakes etc. Seed – raw or cooked. It can be roasted, then ground into a powder and eaten raw or used to thicken soups etc. The seed can also be toasted like popcorn. (4)
Medicinal Uses: The fresh root is anodyne, astringent and demulcent. The pulverized dried rhizomes have been used to arrest bleeding. A tea made from the roots is used in the treatment of dysentery, diarrhoea etc. A poultice made from the roots is used in the treatment of swellings, boils, tumours, inflamed skin etc. (5)
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66(c)
Common Name: Rocky Mountain Pond Lily (Nuphar polysepala)
Native American Name: Wokas (in the Klamath area) (1)
Appearance and Habitat: Pond-lily is a large-leaved, aquatic perennial with bright yellow, waxy blossoms from 3-5 in. in diameter. The leathery, round to oval  leaves may be 4-12 in. long. They are usually floating but are sometimes partially or wholly submersed.   Native Americans ground the seeds for flour and also roasted them as popcorn. This aquatic (and some others, including rice) gives off alcohol instead of carbon dioxide as it takes in oxygen. This species is also known as Wakas. (2) Ponds, shallow lakes, and slow-flowing rivers from valleys to almost 3,000 meters in the mountains in Western N. America – Alaska to California.  It is hardy to zone 4. It is in flower from Jul to August. (3)
Warnings: None (4)
Edible Uses: Root – raw or cooked. Boiled or baked. The root can also be dried and ground into a flour. The rather strong taste can be removed by soaking the root in water prior to use. The N. American Indians used the roots in times of famine. Seed – raw or cooked. The fairly large seed can be dried and ground into a powder and then be used for making porridge or mixed with other flours for making bread. When roasted it resembles popcorn in flavour. (5)  Seed Collected in  Klamath Marsh  which has 10,000 acres of water lily.  It was harvested by Native Americans  in dugouts pulled slowly along pulling the pods off of their stems. Once they were collected  they were emptied into a hole and allowed to ferment for weeks until the end of the season.   The best seeds were then ground into a fine meal. (6)
Medicinal Uses: The root is analgesic and antihaemorrhagic. A decoction is taken in the treatment of pain in any part of the body, and for lung haemorrhages, TB etc. A poultice made from the root is used in the treatment of any pain, rheumatic joints, sores etc. (7)
Foot Notes: (1, 6) Indian Uses of Native Plants by Edith Murphey, page 29,  Publisher: Meyerbooks Copy right 1990; ISBN 0-916638-15-4
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66(d)
Common Name: Varigated Yellow Pond Lily (Nuphar variegata)
Appearance and Habitat: A floating aquatic plant with yellow, cup-like flowers. Flowers: 1 1/2-2 1/2 (3.8-6.3 cm) wide; corolla composed of 6 showy, petal-like sepals and numerous small, yellow, stamen-like petals; stamens  numerous, in several rows; carpels numerous, unit.   This is the most familiar yellow pond-lily in the Northeast. Common Spatterdock (N. lutea ssp. advena) is very similar, but its leaves are frequently raised above the water. It occurs in the southern United States and as far north as New England, New York, pond margins and quiet streams.
(Plants for a Future has no information on this species, I would use this similar to Nuphar lutea, as all are grouped together under that name. )
Reproduced, in part, (as well as previous postings under this title) in accordance with Section 107 of title 17 of the Copyright Law of the United States relating to fair-use and is for the purposes of criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research.