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Before consuming wild plants, contact your doctor to make sure it is safe, and make positive identification in the field using a good source such as Medicinal Plants of the Mountain West.  Michael Moore’s books contain an excellent glossary of medical terms, as well as maps. )
 

# 23

Common Name: Breadroot (This is a very large group and the first latin name changes between Psoralea, Psoralidum, and Pedioelum, they are all called Breadroot or Scurf Pea.) 
Latin Name: Psoralea argophullum, P. digitatum, P. linearifolium, Pedioelum. esculenta 
Family: Leguminosae or Fabaceae
Range: http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=PEAR6 Rocky Mountains to plains including Wisconsin and Illinois (P. argophullum)http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=PECA25 southern coast from Virginia to Alabama (Pedioelum canescens aka Psoralea canescens )
 
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=PECU3 Montana, S. Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, Oklahoma, Colorado, Texas  (Pedioelum cuspidatum aka Psoralea cuspidata )
 
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=PECA24 Arizona, California, Nevada (Pediomelum castoreum aka Psoralea castorea )
 
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=PEES (Pediomelum esculentum aka Psoralea esculentum)  From the Rocky Mountains to the Mississippi River including Wisconsin and New York.  
 
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=PEHYH Montana, Wyoming, colorado, Nebraska, Kansas, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas (Pediomelum hypogaeum aka Psoralea hypogaea)
 
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=PSLA3 all upper plain states and westward plus Iowa (psoralidum laceolatum aka Psoralea lanceolata)
 
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=PESU5 Tennessee, Alabama, Georgia (pediomelum subacaulis)
 
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=PSTE5 Montana to Wisconsin, Wyoming to Illinois, Utah to Kentucky, Arizona to Texas (central U.S. ) (Psoralidium tenuiflorum)
 

#23 (a)

Common Name: Silver Scurf Pea (P. argophylla)
Appearance and Habitat: Dry prairies in N. America – Wisconsin, Minnesota to North Dakota, Sascatchewan, Missouri, Colorado, and New Mexico.  A perennial growing to 0.6 m (2ft).  It can fix nitrogen (like other legumes).
Warnings: Although no specific mention of toxicity for this species has been found, at least some members of this genus   contain furanocoumarins, these substances can cause photosesitivity in some people.
Edible Uses: Root – raw or cooked. The root can also be dried and ground into a powder then used in soups or with cereals for making bread etc.
Medicinal Uses: A tea made from the finely ground leaves and stems is used as a febrifuge. A decoction of the plant can be used as a wash for wounds. An infusion of the root is used to treat chronic constipation
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#23 (b)
Common Name: Buckroot (Psoralea canescens)
Appearance and Habitat: Sandy woods in Eastern N. America – Florida north to Vancouver.  A perennial.
Warnings: (Same as above)
Edible Uses: Root – raw or cooked. The root can also be dried and ground into a powder then used in soups or mixed with cereals for making bread etc.
Medicinal Uses: A poultice of the wet, warmed root has been used as an analgesic dressing on painful areas of the body. An infusion of the roots has been used as a herbal steam in the treatment of runny noses, stuffy heads, coughs and sore throats.
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# 23 (c)
 
Common Name: Beaver Indian Breadroot  ( Psoralea castoria)
Appearance and Habitat: Sandy flats and washes, 500 – 900 meters in California.  A perennial growing to 0.5 m (1ft 8in).
Warnings: (Same as above)
Edible Uses: Root – raw or cooked. A good size. The root can also be dried and ground into a powder then used in soups or with cereals for making bread etc.
Medicinal Uses: None
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# 23 (d)
 
Common Name: Indian Breadroot. Indian Turnip, Largebract Indian Breadroot  (Psoralea cuspidata)
Appearance and Habitat: Dry plains and calcareous hills, clayey, rocky or sandy prairies in Texas.  South- eastern N. America – South Dakota to Kansas, Arkansas and Texas.  A perennial growing to 0.6 m (2ft).
Warnings: (Same as above)
Edible Uses: Root – raw or cooked. The root can also be dried, ground into a powder and used in soups or with cereals for making bread etc.
Medicinal Uses: None
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# 23 (e)
Common Name: Priarie Turnip, Breadroot Scurfpea (P. esculenta)
Native American Name: tipsinnah (Sioux) (1)
Appearance and Habitat: Rocky woods and prairies on calcareous soils.  N. America – Manitoba to North Dakota, Wisconsin and south to Missouri and Texas.  A perennial  growing to 0.3 m (1ft).   It is hardy to zone 4. It is in flower from May to July. (2)  Bloom color is violet (3)
Warnings: This species contains furanocoumarins, these substances can cause photosesitivity in some people. (4)
Edible Uses: Root – raw or cooked. It can also be dried for later use. The dried root can be ground into a powder and used with cereals in making cakes, porridges etc. Starchy and glutinous, the raw root is said to have a sweetish turnip-like taste. The plant is best harvested as the tops die down at the end of the growing season. This food is a staple and also considered to be a luxury item by many native North American Indian tribes. The root contains about 70% starch, 9% protein and 5% sugars (5)  It was gathered before the tops died down, and bunches were braided together and hung-up for use through the winter.  The roots were boiled, roasted, or dried. (6)
Medicinal Uses: An infusion of the dried roots has been used in the treatment of gastro-enteritis, sore throats and chest problems. The roots have been chewed by children as a treatment for bowel complaints. A poultice of the chewed roots has been applied to sprains and fractures(7)
Foot Notes: (1, 6) Indian Uses of Native Plants by Edith Murphey, page 13, Publisher: Meyerbooks Copy right 1990; ISBN 0-916638-154

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# 23 (f)

Common Name: Small Indian Breadroot, Suberranean Indian Breadroot ( Pediomelum hypogaeum)
Photos: http://www.google.com/search?q=photos+of+Pediomelum+hypogaeum&hl=en&biw=1015&bih=588&prmd=imvns&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=OAeWTtyzCabeiAKK0ZWgDQ&ved=0CB0QsAQ
Appearance and Habitat: Rocky or sandy prairies, bluffs, and stream valleys.  Western N. America- Great Plains, east to Nebraska and south to Oklahoma.  A perennial growing to 0.1 (0ft 4in).
Warnings: (Same as above)

Edible Uses: Root – raw or cooked. Rich in starch. The root can also be dried, ground into a powder and used in soups or with cereals for making bread etc. The root is up to 60mm long and 15mm thick. The root was an important food source for the native North American Indians.
Medicinal Uses: None

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# 23 (g)
Common Name: Lemon Scurfpea
Native American Name: Pooy sonib (Pauite) (1)
Photos: http://calphotos.berkeley.edu/cgi/img_query?query_src=photos_index&where-taxon=Psoralidium+lanceolatum
Appearance and Habitat: Dry prairies and hills.  Eastern N. America (Western North America !!) Iowa to North Dakota, Saskatchewan, Kansas, Arizona, and British Columbia.  A perennial growing to 0.6 m (2ft). (2)
Edible Uses: Root – raw or cooked. The root can also be dried, ground into a powder and used in soups or with cereals for making bread etc. One report says that the root of this species is not tuberous. (3)
Medicinal Uses: The Arapahos chew the fresh leaves for a sore throat and voice. (4)
Foot Notes: (1, 4) Indian Uses of Native Plants by Edith Murphey, page 38, Publisher: Meyerbooks Copy right 1990; ISBN 0-916638-15-4
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#23 (h)

Common Name: Whiterim Scurfpea  (pediomelum subacaulis)Photos: http://www.google.com/search?q=photos+of+pediomelum+subacaulis&hl=en&biw=1015&bih=588&prmd=imvns&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=jgWWTszPBofkiALNsIXYDQ&ved=0CB0QsAQ
Appearance and Habitat: Rocky limestone soils and cedar glades in Southeastern N. America.  A perennial growing to 0.2 m (0ft 8in).
Warnings: (Same as above) 
Edible Uses: Root – raw or cooked. It can also be dried, ground into a powder and used in soups or with cereals for making bread etc. Medicinal Uses: None
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# 23 (i)
Common Name: Slimflower scurfpea (pediomelum tenuiflora)Photos: http://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=PSTE5
Appearance and Habitat: Dry prairies, open woods and rocky banks in N. America – Illinois to South Dakota, Texas, Colorado and Montana.  A perennial  growing to 1 m (3ft 3in).
Warnings: (Same as above)
Edible Uses: Root – raw or cooked. It can also be dried, ground into a powder and used in soups or with cereals for making bread etc. One report says that this species does not have a tuberous root.
Medicinal Uses: None

Reproduced, in part, (as well as previous postings under this title) in accordance with Section 107 of title 17 of the Copyright Law of the United States relating to fair-use and is for the purposes of criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research.
 
 
 
 
 
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