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Sorry for lack of plants along the left hand border, it wasn’t my idea. Suddenly, wordpress won’t allow more than 50 ‘recent’ posts along that border, I am trying to correct the problem. In the mean time use Archives or the search engine; I am truly sorry of the inconvenience. It took me completely by surprise when wordpress did this.  In my opinion they ruined the website, that was here to help people.
Medical disclaimer: always check with a physician before consuming wild plants, and make positive identification in the field using a good source such as Medicinal Plants of the Mountain West.  Michael Moore also has a glossary of medical terms in his books, and maps in later editions. ) 
#162 Poplar (part 2)
Latin Name: Populus ×canadensis, P. ×canescens, P. ×jackii
Family: Salicacea
Range:
  http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=POPUL Main database, all of North America

http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=POCA19 California, Utah, Wyoming, N. and S. Dakota, Nebraska, Oklahoma, Minnesota to Arkansas, Wisconsin, Michigan, Ohio, Kentucky, Tennessee, Georgia, North Carolina, Viginia, W. Virginia, Maryland, Delaware, Pennsylvania and New York; In Canada; Ontario and Quebec. (Populus ×canadensis)
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=POCA14 All states east of the Mississippi R., plus Minnesota, Arkansas and Louisiana; In Canada; Ontario, Quebec and New Brunswick. (Populus ×canescens)
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=POJA2 All states north of the Ohio R. and eastward to the coast, plus W. Virginia, Virginia, Maryland, North Carolina, Kentucky, Tennessee, Georgia, N. and S. Dakota, Nebraska, Montana, Wyoming, Idaho, Colorado and all states along the west bank of the Mississippi, except Louisiana; In Canada; all lower Provinces except British Columbia. (Populus ×jackii)
Photos : (Click on Latin name after common name )
Warnings:
None on Plants For A Future
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#162 (j)
Common Name: Carolina Poplar, Canadian Poplar (Populus ×canadensis)
Appearance and Habitat:
A group of naturally occuring hybrids between P. nigra and P. deltoidea in North America. A deciduous tree growing to 40 m (131ft) by 12 m (39ft) at a fast rate. It is hardy to zone 4.

Edible Uses: None
Medicinal Uses : Although no specific mention has been seen for this species, the bark of most, if not all members of the genus contain salicin, a glycoside that probably decomposes into salicylic acid (aspirin) in the body. The bark is therefore anodyne, anti-inflammatory and febrifuge. It is used especially in treating rheumatism and fevers, and also to relieve the pain of menstrual cramps.
 http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Populus+x+canadensis
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#162 (k)
Common Name: Grey Poplar (Populus ×canescens)
Appearance and Habitat: Probably native in damp woods in S.C. and E. England. Europe, from Britain and France east to S. Russia, south to Italy and Macedonia. A deciduous tree growing to 30 m (98ft) by 15 m (49ft). It is hardy to zone 4. It is in flower from Feb to March.
Edible Uses: None
Medicinal Uses : Although no specific mention has been seen for this species, the bark of most, if not all members of the genus contain salicin, a glycoside that probably decomposes into salicylic acid (aspirin) in the body. The bark is therefore anodyne, anti-inflammatory and febrifuge. It is used especially in treating rheumatism and fevers, and also to relieve the pain of menstrual cramps.
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Populus+x+canescens
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#162 (l)
Common Name: Balm of Gilead (Populus ×jackii)
Appearance and Habitat: Not known in a truly wild situation. The origins of this tree is obscure. A deciduous tree growing to 30 m (98ft) by 12 m (39ft) at a fast rate. It is hardy to zone 2. It is in flower in April, and the seeds ripen in May.
Edible Uses: None
Medicinal Uses : Balm of Gilead is a common ingredient of cough medicines, its expectorant, antiseptic and analgesic actions making it an excellent remedy for a range of respiratory problems. It has also been used for several thousand years to soothe inflamed or irritated skin. The leaf buds are covered with a resinous sap that has a strong turpentine odour and a bitter taste. They also contain salicin, a glycoside that probably decomposes into salicylic acid (aspirin) in the body. The buds are antiscorbutic, antiseptic, balsamic, diuretic, expectorant, stimulant and tonic. They are taken internally in the treatment of bronchitis, sore throats, dry irritable coughs and other upper respiratory tract infections. They should not be prescribed to patients who are sensitive to aspirin. Externally, the buds are used to treat colds, sinusitis, arthritis, rheumatism, muscular pain, grazes, small wounds and dry skin conditions. They can be put in hot water and used as an inhalant to relieve congested nasal passages. Internal use of the plant is believed to reduce milk flow in nursing mothers. The buds are harvested in the spring before they open and are dried for later use. Although no specific mention has been seen for this species, the bark of most, if not all members of the genus contain salicin, a glycoside that probably decomposes into salicylic acid (aspirin) in the body. The bark is therefore anodyne, anti-inflammatory and febrifuge. It is used especially in treating rheumatism and fevers, and also to relieve the pain of menstrual cramps.
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Populus+x+jackii
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(Now for Michael Moore who covers all Poplars in the west.)

Appearance and Habitat:
The leaves of the Poplars in the west are heart shaped, bright green with long stems, turning a brilliant yellow in the fall. The leaf buds are waxy and scaled in appearance. Before the leaves appear the trees have long catkins. The bark is light and smooth, except in older trees it becomes furrowed. Aspen, however, retains its smooth bark. Both Cottonwoods and Poplars are associated with water, where Aspens are associated with high mountains. Fremont’s Cottonwood grows along live rivers, streams, or around underground springs throughout its range. Aspens grow in areas of mountains that have an elevation of at least from 8,500 ft., but can sometimes be found at 6,000 ft. Aspens inhabit burn areas in the mountains and are replaced by pine and spruce, or subalpine meadows covering an entire hillside. P. balsamifera and P. trichocarpa, the balsam poplars, frequently form hybrids and can be found in nearly all canyons of the west. The grow from Alaska to California, east to Colorado and the Great Lakes region.
Medicinal Uses : The buds should be collected in the spring, the leaves in midsummer and the bark in the fall or early spring. Collect the leaves, cut off the stems, tie in small bundles (less than 1/4 inch) and hang them to dry in the shade. The buds should be dried in cheesecloth, folded and hung in an airy area. Every few days stir the buds to help them dry faster. It is very common for branches to break off in thunderstorms, as long as the leaves are still green, use them for the bark. Make shallow cuts around the diameter of the limb every foot, and diagonal cuts every few inches, then strip off the bark from the inner wood. Run oiled wire through the bark and hang it in the shade to dry. All of the species contains salicin and populin, precusors of aspirin, and are very helpful with any inflammation. Tea from the bark is rather bitter, tea from the leaves can be used in the same manner and is preferred by some people. The drawback is the tea from the leaves is not as strong. To make tea from the bark, combine 1 part dried bark to 32 parts water (by weight) and bring slowly to a boil. Let it continue to boil for 10 minutes, remove from heat, let cool, strain, and return the water to 32 parts. For the leaves follow the same procedure, except put them in the water as it boils and remove from the heat immediately, then strain, return the water level. You can take 2 – 4 ounces of the tea up to 4 times a day (bark) or 5 times a day (leaves). The tea of either has been used in place of quinine for fevers, but not for malaria. Both uses are also helpful with urinary tract inflammations and as a diuretic to increase urine acidity. The fresh or dried plants (after moistening) can be used as a poultice for muscle aches, sprains and swollen joints. The buds are the strongest part of the plant, but the constituents are not very water soluble. You can fill a jar with the fresh buds, then fill with olive oil allow it to sit for a week in a warm location and then strain the buds from the oil. Re- heat the oil over low heat, add some bees wax to make a topical ointment. A tincture of the buds can also be make using 1 part to 2 parts (by weight) 75% vodka for fresh buds or for dried buds 1 part buds to 5 parts alcohol. Take between 15 and 30 drops throughout the day. The bud tincture is excellent to help remove mucus from bronchitis or bronchorrhea. Both the bud tincture and buds drained from the oil make an excellent analgesic for joint and muscle pain.
Other Uses : The dried wood from the fallen branches make an excellent walking stick or cane.
Medicinal Plants of the Mountain West 2nd Edition, by Michael Moore, pages 206-207, Publisher: Museum of New Mexico Press, Copyright 2003, ISBN 0-89013-454-5

The solution for past posts, other than top 50, are now listed below the comment section in the footer as a drop down list. At least that will give you an idea of where in the archives the post can be found. Not the solution I was hoping for.

Reproduced, in part, (as well as previous postings under this title) in accordance with Section 107 of title 17 of the Copyright Law of the United States relating to fair-use and is for the purposes of criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research.  
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